Month: April 2019

My Top 10 Ways to Prevent Burnout That Will Make You Remarkable

My Top 10 Ways to Prevent Burnout That Will Make You Remarkable

Burnout is a mission-critical issue. However, luck has it that there are ways to prevent burnout before you succumb to your fatigue.

To clarify, it is the unfortunate result of overworking and excessively exerting barrels of willpower: the mental state whereby you are magically unable to be the most productive person you can be.

Therefore, you should manage your time wisely such that burnout is a mere non-issue.

Dealing with Study Burnout (Especially Before Exams)

As a student, burnout may be an ever more frightening problem for your mental health. Not to mention, your exam success.

So, you must take precautions to prevent burning out as a result of too much studying.

Of course, silently approaching you from the corner, exams put more and more pressure on you: your mental performance as well as your emotional management. After all, exam stress isn’t particularly uncommon.

Thanks to burnout, here’s the paradox: the more you study, the less able you are to study.

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in Other, 0 comments
How Should You Prioritise Your Work as a Student?

How Should You Prioritise Your Work as a Student?

Is it really necessary to prioritise your work as a student? Don’t be silly—of course it certainly is!

After all, not all work has an equal impact on your life; look at the infamous 80/20 principle, for instance.

Why Is It Important to Prioritise Tasks?

The 80/20 rule suggests that—in almost every situation—20% of the possible work you can do will contribute to 80% of the success. Additionally, further ideas have sprung up, such as 5% of the work accounting for 50% of the outcome.

A diagram showing the 80-20 principle means you must prioritise your work as a student and use high-leverage tasks.
Do the least amount of work but maximise success with high-leverage tasks.

In short, though, here’s the key message: there are certain tasks that have significantly more impact.

So, if you can find those tasks and only spend your limited time on them, you’ll be unstoppable. This is because each minute of your day will be much more meaningful than if you committed to useless tasks.

Undoubtedly, this is an incredibly important concept to understand and use—especially with regard to your school life.

To demonstrate, you could apply this to your independent study and revision, albeit not homework and assignment as much. (For you see, homework and other assignments may require you use your time in a certain way, but not invariably.)

Stepping back a bit more, you could view your entire life as a list of both academic and personal work. In this case, you’re prioritising your work as a student as well as non-student.

Furthermore, what is your success—the idealised outcome? Is it academic, hence passing exams successfully? Or, rather, perhaps you’re thinking more about overall life success.

Regardless, the way to reach success is to prioritise your work both within and outside of academia.

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in Other, 0 comments
How to Stop Unwanted Thoughts While Studying (For Better Focus)

How to Stop Unwanted Thoughts While Studying (For Better Focus)

What reduces focus and concentration whilst doing work? Distractions. What is a notable source of distractions? Your own thoughts.

In this article, I’m going to show you how to stop these unwanted thoughts (while studying) from. How? By getting them out of your head then onto paper or whatever other storage medium is most convenient.

But I’m getting ahead of myself here; I haven’t exactly specified what these distracting, unwanted thoughts are.

What is Mind Wandering and Distracting Thoughts?

I like to think of the concept of “pop-up” ideas, which are essentially spontaneous thoughts. To clarify, these are the random thoughts that pop into your mind throughout the day.

And it’s distracting.

Whether it’s a task for later, a revolutionary new idea, or what you’re having for dinner tonight, a thought can come from anywhere. Anytime.

Also, because these thoughts are seldom relevant to the current context, they are often unwanted. (Heart-breaking, no?)

As a consequence of an unpredictable and uncontrollable flow of ideas to your head, “mind wandering” enters the scene.

For you see, while you desperately try to maintain focus whilst studying, your mind keeps wandering off. Although, from a rational perspective, you don’t really want to be thinking about dinner as you calculate 2+2.

So, the consequence: why must productive people stop unwanted thoughts while studying (or doing other things)?

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in Other, 0 comments
How to Organise Your Time at Home (with Compartmentalisation)

How to Organise Your Time at Home (with Compartmentalisation)

How to Not Organise Your Time Effectively

Is your day a mishmash of unrelated tasks unwillingly put together on a rather daunting to-do list? If so, let’s fix that: you need to know how to organise your time for studying sustainably and efficiently.

Also, we’ll be using an indispensable technique referred to as “compartmentalisation”—quite a mouthful, I know.

But what is life like without it—why is there a need for compartmentalisation?

As I alluded to earlier, if you fail to organise the time in your day into distinguished blocks, you thus end up with a mess; while you might have an idea as to what to do in a day, the day itself has no structure.

For example, you could create yourself a daily to-do list that clearly sets out all the activities for the day. However, this is insufficient if you want to manage your time efficiently for studying and other tasks.

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in Other, 0 comments