exam revision

Should You Sleep or Study All Night? You’ll Hate the Truth

Should You Sleep or Study All Night? You’ll Hate the Truth

We’ve all been there: the anxiety kicks in the day prior to a rather frightening examination. And now you’re asking yourself, should I sleep or study all night?

Perhaps it isn’t even a particularly threatening exam, but you simply feel obliged to cram in the facts.

However, this is not necessarily the way to go. Further into this article, I’ll soon show you this with a brief story of my experience.

Staying up late and studying is, in fact, the perfect recipe for academic failure.

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in Fighting Resistance and Staying on Track, The Student Life, 0 comments
Study Techniques for Memorization That Will Make You Flawless

Study Techniques for Memorization That Will Make You Flawless

Today, I shall present to you some invaluable study techniques for the memorisation of knowledge you need for your exams. After all, we’ve all been in that position where we forgot that crucial fact, necessary for answering a question.

Having guaranteed access to a fact (in your mind) could be the catalyst for everything else to follow; from a single piece of factual information, you could use your general understanding to prove your capability in an exam.

Subjects including the sciences and the mathematics may be obvious exemplars of the power of memorisation. Certainly, formulas are essential in ensuring your calculation makes sense.

Nonetheless, practically every other subject has key cornerstones which you could memorise to support the mass of your remaining understanding.

As a result, you better be learning some fast memorisation techniques as a student before it’s too late!

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in Efficient Learning Techniques, 0 comments
Are You Ill-Prepared for Exams? Read This Quickly

Are You Ill-Prepared for Exams? Read This Quickly

Indeed, it is that time of year again when the strike of a gong will soon commence the commonly dreaded: exam season.

During this difficult time, you may find yourself spending countless hours studying without ceasing. Cramming before exam-ing, so they say (?)

Undoubtedly, this might be a nightmarishly hard time of the year due to your burning obsession to succeed. What’s more, this is especially true when given that you haven’t done as much revision in advance as you should have.

However, today I’m going to share with you a few key last-minute exam revision tips; these will help you use your time as effectively as time permits to cram those facts in your head!

The Fundamental Building Blocks of Effective Study

Now, let us establish that merely reading over information is—by far—a disappointingly inefficient learning strategy. After reading a 400-page textbook in one day, are you going to be able to memorise every little fact in it?

Evidently not, because learning is undeniably a more sophisticated process than that. Otherwise, everybody would be a professional learner!

So, what is the most efficient way to cram facts into your skull?

Last-minute exam revision involves cramming knowledge into your brain like it's a computer

Active recall and spatial repetition.

Saving you time whilst forcing your brain to learn, these two principles allow you to use your time optimally.

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in The Student Life, 0 comments
How Should You Prioritise Your Work as a Student?

How Should You Prioritise Your Work as a Student?

Is it really necessary to prioritise your work as a student? Don’t be silly—of course it certainly is!

After all, not all work has an equal impact on your life; look at the infamous 80/20 principle, for instance.

Why Is It Important to Prioritise Tasks?

The 80/20 rule suggests that—in almost every situation—20% of the possible work you can do will contribute to 80% of the success. Additionally, further ideas have sprung up, such as 5% of the work accounting for 50% of the outcome.

A diagram showing the 80-20 principle means you must prioritise your work as a student and use high-leverage tasks.
Do the least amount of work but maximise success with high-leverage tasks.

In short, though, here’s the key message: there are certain tasks that have significantly more impact.

So, if you can find those tasks and only spend your limited time on them, you’ll be unstoppable. This is because each minute of your day will be much more meaningful than if you committed to useless tasks.

Undoubtedly, this is an incredibly important concept to understand and use—especially with regard to your school life.

To demonstrate, you could apply this to your independent study and revision, albeit not homework and assignment as much. (For you see, homework and other assignments may require you use your time in a certain way, but not invariably.)

Stepping back a bit more, you could view your entire life as a list of both academic and personal work. In this case, you’re prioritising your work as a student as well as non-student.

Furthermore, what is your success—the idealised outcome? Is it academic, hence passing exams successfully? Or, rather, perhaps you’re thinking more about overall life success.

Regardless, the way to reach success is to prioritise your work both within and outside of academia.

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in Productivity Systems, 0 comments
Why Is Time Management Important for Students?

Why Is Time Management Important for Students?

Effective Revision Techniques Are Not Enough

Poor people value money. Successful people value time.

Time management is important for students because you cannot have academic and career success without investing your time. What’s more, merely putting in the time will not suffice—you must learn to manage your time wisely.

But why? The immense importance of time management for students makes it an essential skill for any ambitious student.

Despite this, schools rarely ever provide solid and sane advice with regards to time management. Rubbish!

All they say is:

“Create a revision timetable and you’ll be fine!”

“Spend two hours each night revising”

“Motivate yourself—revise for twenty minutes then take a ten-minute break”

Oh, and then you’ll have to somehow find a way to factor in homework. Not to mention, the advice you’ve been given in the educational system is—most likely—vague and ambiguous.

You’re better than this.

As a result of following all of the wrong advice, you might just end up as an academic robot.

Not only is this so impractical that it will destroy you, but academia is not everything; there’s more to life than good grades and being trapped in dull 9-to-5 jobs. (We’ll speak more about this later.)

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in The Student Life, 0 comments
Writing vs Typing: Which is the Best for Your Desired Results?

Writing vs Typing: Which is the Best for Your Desired Results?

When Should You Think About Writing vs Typing?

Ask me several months ago to decide between writing and typing. I would have certainly concluded that typing, digitalised information etc is far better. Nevertheless, I’ve found that this is not always the case…

Organising your life can be difficult when you have a shortage of a clear, definitive, step-by-step plan. Accordingly, a lot of organisational aspects, such as the question of writing vs typing, are up to you.

Writing vs typing: an idea on a sticky note pinned to a noticeboard

Above all, getting ideas out of your head is ridiculously important to help clarify and organise your life. But how do you do this?

In today’s day and age, the two most obvious forms of media are:

  • Pen and paper
  • Digital storage

Boil that down further, you subsequently reach the decision between two methods of expressing information:

  • Write stuff down by hand, or
  • Type, with a keyboard, words into a digital device, for example, your desktop computer or smartphone.

So, which method is better? I hate to say that this depends heavily on your objective as well as your preferences.

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Posted by Luis Thiam-Nye in Efficient Learning Techniques, 0 comments